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  Microsoft Data Access Components code execution

From:MICROSOFT <secure_(at)_microsoft.com>
Date:13.02.2007
Subject:Microsoft Security Bulletin MS07-009 Vulnerability in Microsoft Data Access Components Could Allow Remote Code Execution (927779)

Microsoft Security Bulletin MS07-009
Vulnerability in Microsoft Data Access Components Could Allow Remote Code Execution (927779)
Published: February 13, 2007

Version: 1.0
Summary

Who Should Read this Document: Customers who use Microsoft Windows

Impact of Vulnerability: Remote Code Execution

Maximum Severity Rating: Critical

Recommendation: Customers should apply the update immediately

Security Update Replacement: This bulletin replaces a prior security update. See the frequently asked questions (FAQ) section of this bulletin for the complete list.

Caveats: None

Tested Software and Security Update Download Locations:

Affected Software:


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.5 Service Pack 3 on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 – Download the update


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 1 on Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 — Download the update


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 — Download the update


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 for Itanium-based Systems — Download the update

Non-Affected Software:


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 2 on Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 2 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 2 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 with SP1 for Itanium-based Systems


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 2 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition


Windows Data Access Components 6.0 on Windows Vista

Tested Microsoft Windows Components:

Affected Components:


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.7 Service Pack 1 when installed on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 — Download the update


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 when installed on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 — Download the update


Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 1 when installed on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 — Download the update

Note The “Affected Software” section applies to MDAC that shipped with a Microsoft Windows operating system. The “Affected Components” section applies to MDAC that was downloaded and installed onto a Microsoft Windows operating system.

Note Microsoft strongly recommends that all customers who currently use a version of Windows that does not have Microsoft Data Access Components 2.7 Service Pack 1 or higher upgrade immediately to Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 1 or another supported version. The only exception to this notice is customers who currently use Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 running Microsoft Data Access Components 2.5 Service Pack 3. See Knowledge Base Article 915387 for more information.

The software in this list has been tested to determine whether the versions are affected. Other versions either no longer include security update support or may not be affected. To determine the support life cycle for your product and version, visit the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Web site.
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General Information

Executive Summary

Executive Summary:

This update resolves a public vulnerability. The vulnerability is documented in the "Vulnerability Details" section of this bulletin.

If a user is logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of an affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights.

We recommend that customers apply the update immediately.

Severity Ratings and Vulnerability Identifiers:
Vulnerability Identifiers Impact of Vulnerability Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Microsoft Windows Server 2003

Microsoft Windows MDAC ActiveX Vulnerability - CVE-2006-5559


Remote Code Execution


Critical


Critical


Moderate

This assessment is based on the types of systems that are affected by the vulnerability, their typical deployment patterns, and the effect that exploiting the vulnerability would have on them.

Note By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2003 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration. See the FAQ section for this security update for more information about Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration.

Note The severity ratings for non-x86 operating system versions map to the x86 operating systems versions as follows:


The Windows Server 2003 for Itanium-based Systems severity rating is the same as the Windows Server 2003 severity rating.
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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Related to This Security Update

Can I detect what version of MDAC is installed on my system?
Yes, there is a tool available that you can use to determine the version of MDAC that you have installed on your system. For more information about how to install and use this tool, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 301202. For information about the different MDAC versions that are available and the products that install them, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 231943.

I am currently using Microsoft Data Access Components 2.6 or 2.6 Service Pack 1. Neither is mentioned in this update. What do I do?
Microsoft Data Access Components 2.6 and Microsoft Data Access Components 2.6 Service Pack 1 have reached the end of their support life cycles. It should be a priority for customers who have these versions to migrate to the supported version. The supported version is Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 1.

What updates does this release replace?
This security update replaces a prior security update. The security bulletin ID and affected operating systems are listed in the following table.
Bulletin ID Microsoft Data Access Components 2.5 Service Pack 3 on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Microsoft Data Access Components 2.7 Service Pack 1 when installed on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 when installed on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 1 when installed on Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 Service Pack 1 on Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Microsoft Data Access Components 2.8 on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 for Itanium-based Systems

MS06-014


Replaced


Replaced


Replaced


Replaced


Not Replaced


Not Replaced


Not Replaced

Extended security update support for Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 1a, Windows XP Media Center Edition 2002 Service Pack 1, Windows XP Media Center Edition 2004 Service Pack 1, Windows XP Professional Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 1a, and Windows XP Tablet PC Edition Service Pack 1 ended on October 10, 2006. I am still using one of these operating systems; what should I do?
Windows XP (all versions) Service Pack 1 has reached the end of its support life cycle. It should be a priority for customers who have these operating system versions to migrate to supported versions to prevent potential exposure to vulnerabilities. For more information about the Windows Product Lifecycle, visit the following Microsoft Support Lifecycle Web site. For more information about the extended security update support period for these operating system versions, visit the Microsoft Product Support Services Web site.

Extended security update support for Microsoft Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Millennium Edition ended on July 11, 2006. I am still using one of these operating systems; what should I do?
Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, and Windows Millennium Edition have reached the end of their support life cycles. It should be a priority for customers who have these operating system versions to migrate to supported versions to prevent potential exposure to vulnerabilities. For more information about the Windows Product Lifecycle, visit the following Microsoft Support Lifecycle Web site. For more information about the extended security update support period for these operating system versions, visit the Microsoft Product Support Services Web site.

Extended security update support for Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Service Pack 6a and Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 ended on June 30, 2004. Extended security update support for Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Service Pack 6a ended on December 31, 2004. Extended security update support for Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 ended on June 30, 2005. I am still using one of these operating systems; what should I do?
Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Service Pack 6a, Windows NT Server 4.0 Service Pack 6a, Windows 2000 Service Pack 2, and Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 have reached the end of their support life cycles. It should be a priority for customers who have these operating system versions to migrate to supported versions to prevent potential exposure to vulnerabilities. For more information about the Windows Product Lifecycle, visit the following Microsoft Support Lifecycle Web site. For more information about the extended security update support period for these operating system versions, visit the Microsoft Product Support Services Web site.

Customers who require custom support for these products must contact their Microsoft account team representative, their Technical Account Manager, or the appropriate Microsoft partner representative for custom support options. Customers without an Alliance, Premier, or Authorized Contract can contact their local Microsoft sales office. For contact information, visit the Microsoft Worldwide Information Web site, select the country, and then click Go to see a list of telephone numbers. When you call, ask to speak with the local Premier Support sales manager. For more information, see the Windows Operating System Product Support Lifecycle FAQ.

For more information, visit the Windows Operating System FAQ.

Can I use the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) to determine whether this update is required?
The following table provides the MBSA detection summary for this security update.
Product MBSA 1.2.1 EST MBSA 2.0

Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4


No


Yes


Yes

Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2


Yes


Not Applicable


Yes

Microsoft Windows Server 2003


Yes


Not Applicable


Yes

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 for Itanium-based Systems


No


No


Yes

For more information about MBSA, visit the MBSA Web site. For more information about the programs that Microsoft Update and MBSA 2.0 currently do not detect, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 895660.

For more detailed information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 910723.

What is the Enterprise Update Scan Tool (EST)?
As part of an ongoing commitment to provide detection tools for bulletin-class security updates, Microsoft delivers a stand-alone detection tool whenever the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) and the Office Detection Tool (ODT) cannot detect whether the update is required for an MSRC release cycle. This stand-alone tool is called the Enterprise Update Scan Tool (EST) and is designed for enterprise administrators. When a version of the Enterprise Update Scan Tool is created for a specific bulletin, customers can run the tool from a command-line interface (CLI) and view the results of the XML output file. To help customers better utilize the tool, detailed documentation will be provided with the tool. There is also a version of the tool that offers an integrated experience for SMS administrators.

Can I use a version of the Enterprise Update Scan Tool (EST) to determine whether this update is required?
Yes. Microsoft has created a version of EST that will determine if you have to apply this update. For download links and more information about the version of EST that is being released this month, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 894193. SMS customers should review the following FAQ, “Can I use Systems Management Server (SMS) to determine whether this update is required?" for more information about SMS and EST.

Can I use Systems Management Server (SMS) to determine whether this update is required?
The following table provides the SMS detection summary for this security update.
Product SMS 2.0 SMS 2003

Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4


Yes (with EST)


Yes

Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2


Yes


Yes

Microsoft Windows Server 2003


Yes


Yes

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 for Itanium-based Systems


No


Yes

SMS 2.0 and SMS 2003 Software Update Services (SUS) Feature Pack can use MBSA 1.2.1 for detection and therefore have the same limitation that is listed earlier in this bulletin related to programs that MBSA 1.2.1 does not detect.

For SMS 2.0, the SMS SUS Feature Pack, which includes the Security Update Inventory Tool (SUIT), can be used by SMS to detect security updates. SMS SUIT uses the MBSA 1.2.1 engine for detection. For more information about SUIT, visit the following Microsoft Web site. For more information about the limitations of SUIT, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 306460. The SMS SUS Feature Pack also includes the Microsoft Office Inventory Tool to detect required updates for Microsoft Office applications.

For SMS 2003, the SMS 2003 Inventory Tool for Microsoft Updates (ITMU) can be used by SMS to detect security updates that are offered by Microsoft Update and that are supported by Windows Server Update Services. For more information about the SMS 2003 ITMU, visit the following Microsoft Web site. SMS 2003 can also use the Microsoft Office Inventory Tool to detect required updates for Microsoft Office applications.

For more information about SMS, visit the SMS Web site.

For more detailed information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 910723.
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Vulnerability Details

Microsoft Windows MDAC ActiveX Vulnerability - CVE-2006-5559:

A remote code execution vulnerability exists in the ADODB.Connection ActiveX control that is provided as part of the ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) and that is distributed in MDAC. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of an affected system.

Mitigating Factors for Microsoft Windows MDAC ActiveX Vulnerability - CVE-2006-5559:


In a Web-based attack scenario, an attacker would have to host a Web site that contains a Web page that is used to exploit this vulnerability. An attacker would have no way to force users to visit the page. Instead, an attacker would have to persuade users to visit the Web site, typically by getting them to click a link in an e-mail message or instant messenger message that takes users to the attacker's Web site.


An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the logged on user. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights.


By default, all supported versions of Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Outlook Express open HTML e-mail messages in the Restricted sites zone. The Restricted sites zone helps reduce attacks that could try to exploit this vulnerability by preventing Active Scripting and ActiveX controls from being used when reading HTML e-mail. However, if a user clicks on a link within an e-mail they could still be vulnerable to this issue through the Web-based attack scenario.


By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2003 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration. This mode sets the security level for the Internet zone to High. This is a mitigating factor for Web sites that have not been added to Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone. See the FAQ section of this security update for more information about Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration.
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Workarounds for Microsoft Windows MDAC ActiveX Vulnerability - CVE-2006-5559:

Microsoft has tested the following workarounds. Although these workarounds will not correct the underlying vulnerability, they help block known attack vectors. When a workaround reduces functionality, it is identified in the following section.


Prevent the ADODB.Connection ActiveX Control from running in Internet Explorer

Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

1.


Save the following text to a .reg file and then run it on the vulnerable client.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ActiveX Compatibility\{00000514-0000-0010-8000-00AA006D2EA4}]
Compatibility Flags=dword:00000400

2.


You can apply this .reg file to individual systems by double-clicking it. You can also apply it across domains by using Group Policy. For more information about Group Policy, visit the following Microsoft Web sites:

Group Policy collection
What is Group Policy Object Editor?
Core Group Policy tools and settings

Impact of Workaround: Disables some MDAC functionality from within Internet Explorer.

To Rollback:

Remove the above registry entry from the registry.


Unregister the ADO ActiveX controls

Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.


At the command prompt run the following:

regsvr32 -u "%CommonProgramFiles%\System\ado\msado15.dll”

Impact of Workaround: This will likely break lots of MDAC functionality, more intrusive than the killbit above.

To Rollback:


At the command prompt run the following:

regsvr32 "%CommonProgramFiles%\System\ado\msado15.dll”


Configure Internet Explorer to prompt before running ActiveX Controls or disable ActiveX Controls in the Internet and Local intranet security zone

You can help protect against this vulnerability by changing your Internet Explorer settings to prompt before running ActiveX controls. To do this, follow these steps:

1.


In Internet Explorer, click Internet Options on the Tools menu.

2.


Click the Security tab.

3.


Click Internet, and then click Custom Level.

4.


Under Settings, in the ActiveX controls and plug-ins section, under Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK.

5.


Click Local intranet, and then click Custom Level.

6.


Under Settings, in the ActiveX controls and plug-ins section, under Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins, click Prompt or Disable, and then click OK.

7.


Click OK two times to return to Internet Explorer.

Impact of Workaround: There are side effects to prompting before running ActiveX controls. Many Web sites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use ActiveX to provide additional functionality. For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running ActiveX controls is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround. For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run ActiveX controls. If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone”.

Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone. This will allow you to continue to use trusted Web sites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone.

To do this, follow these steps:

1.


In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab.

2.


In the Select a Web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites.

3.


If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box.

4.


In the Add this Web site to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add.

5.


Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone.

6.


Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer.

Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your computer. Two in particular that you may want to add are "*.windowsupdate.microsoft.com" and “*.update.microsoft.com” (without the quotation marks). These are the sites that will host the update, and it requires an ActiveX Control to install the update.


Set Internet and Local intranet security zone settings to “High” to prompt before running ActiveX Controls and Active Scripting in these zones

You can help protect against this vulnerability by changing your settings for the Internet security zone to prompt before running ActiveX controls. You can do this by setting your browser security to High.

To raise the browsing security level in Microsoft Internet Explorer, follow these steps:

1.


On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options.

2.


In the Internet Options dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click the Internet icon.

3.


Under Security level for this zone, move the slider to High. This sets the security level for all Web sites you visit to High.

Note If no slider is visible, click Default Level, and then move the slider to High.

Note Setting the level to High may cause some Web sites to work incorrectly. If you have difficulty using a Web site after you change this setting, and you are sure the site is safe to use, you can add that site to your list of trusted sites. This will allow the site to work correctly even with the security setting set to High.

Impact of Workaround: There are side effects to prompting before running ActiveX controls. Many Web sites that are on the Internet or on an intranet use ActiveX to provide additional functionality. For example, an online e-commerce site or banking site may use ActiveX controls to provide menus, ordering forms, or even account statements. Prompting before running ActiveX controls is a global setting that affects all Internet and intranet sites. You will be prompted frequently when you enable this workaround. For each prompt, if you feel you trust the site that you are visiting, click Yes to run ActiveX controls. If you do not want to be prompted for all these sites, use the steps outlined in "Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone”.

Add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

After you set Internet Explorer to require a prompt before it runs ActiveX controls and Active Scripting in the Internet zone and in the Local intranet zone, you can add sites that you trust to the Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone. This will allow you to continue to use trusted Web sites exactly as you do today, while helping to protect you from this attack on untrusted sites. We recommend that you add only sites that you trust to the Trusted sites zone.

To do this, follow these steps:

1.


In Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Internet Options, and then click the Security tab.

2.


In the Select a Web content zone to specify its current security settings box, click Trusted Sites, and then click Sites.

3.


If you want to add sites that do not require an encrypted channel, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box.

4.


In the Add this Web site to the zone box, type the URL of a site that you trust, and then click Add.

5.


Repeat these steps for each site that you want to add to the zone.

6.


Click OK two times to accept the changes and return to Internet Explorer.

Note Add any sites that you trust not to take malicious action on your computer. Two in particular that you may want to add are "*.windowsupdate.microsoft.com" and “*.update.microsoft.com” (without the quotation marks). These are the sites that will host the update, and it requires an ActiveX Control to install the update.
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FAQ for Microsoft Windows MDAC ActiveX Vulnerability - CVE-2006-5559:

What is the scope of the vulnerability?
A remote code execution vulnerability exists in the ADODB.Connection ActiveX control that is provided as part of the ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) and that is distributed in MDAC. If a user were logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of an affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less affected than users who operate with administrative rights.

What causes the vulnerability?
The ADODB.Connection ActiveX control included in MDAC could, if passed unexpected data, cause Internet Explorer to fail in a way that could allow code execution.

What might an attacker use the vulnerability to do?
An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of the affected system.

How could an attacker exploit the vulnerability?
An attacker could host a specially crafted Web site that is designed to exploit this vulnerability through Internet Explorer and then persuade a user to view the Web site. This can also include Web sites that accept user-provided content or advertisements, Web sites that host user-provided content or advertisements, and compromised Web sites. These Web sites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit this vulnerability. In all cases, however, an attacker would have no way to force users to visit these Web sites. Instead, an attacker would have to persuade users to visit the Web site, typically by getting them to click a link in an e-mail message or in an Instant Messenger request that takes users to the attacker's Web site. It could also be possible to display specially crafted Web content by using banner advertisements or by using other methods to deliver Web content to affected systems.

What systems are primarily at risk from the vulnerability?
This vulnerability requires that a user is logged on and visits a Web site for any malicious action to occur. Therefore, any systems where Internet Explorer is used frequently, such as workstations or terminal servers, are at the most risk from this vulnerability.

I am running Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2003. Does this mitigate this vulnerability?
Yes. By default, Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2003 runs in a restricted mode that is known as Enhanced Security Configuration. This mode sets the security level for the Internet zone to High. This is a mitigating factor for Web sites that have not been added to Internet Explorer Trusted sites zone.

What is the Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration?
Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration is a group of preconfigured Internet Explorer settings that reduce the likelihood of a user or of an administrator downloading and running specially crafted Web content on a server. Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration reduces this risk by modifying many security-related settings. This includes the settings on the Security tab and the Advanced tab in the Internet Options dialog box. Some of the important modifications include the following:

Security level for the Internet zone is set to High. This setting disables scripts, ActiveX controls, Microsoft Java Virtual Machine (MSJVM), and file downloads.

Automatic detection of intranet sites is disabled. This setting assigns all intranet Web sites and all Universal Naming Convention (UNC) paths that are not explicitly listed in the Local intranet zone to the Internet zone.

Install On Demand and non-Microsoft browser extensions are disabled. This setting prevents Web pages from automatically installing components and prevents non-Microsoft extensions from running.

Multimedia content is disabled. This setting prevents music, animations, and video clips from running.

For more information regarding Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration, see the guide, Managing Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration, at the following Web site.

What does the update do?
The update removes the vulnerability by modifying the way that the ADODB.Connection ActiveX control performs parameter validation.

When this security bulletin was issued, had this vulnerability been publicly disclosed?
Yes. This vulnerability has been publicly disclosed. It has been assigned Common Vulnerability and Exposure number CVE-2006-5559.

When this security bulletin was issued, had Microsoft received any reports that this vulnerability was being exploited?
No. Microsoft had seen examples of proof of concept code published publicly but had not received any information to indicate that this vulnerability had been publicly used to attack customers when this security bulletin was originally issued.

Acknowledgments

Microsoft thanks the following for working with us to help protect customers:


FrSIRT for originally reporting the Microsoft Windows MDAC ActiveX Vulnerability (CVE-2006-5559).


Disclaimer:

The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.

Revisions:


V1.0 (February 13, 2007): Bulletin published.

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